Commissioner Events

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In conjunction with the release of the Commission's Report, "A healthier, safer, and more prosperous world," the CSIS Global Health Policy Center will be holding a number of events in Washington, D.C. and all over the country to discuss the future of global health and the impact of the Commission's recommendations on global health policy over the next year. Many of these events will be webcast live, giving you the opportunity to participate from any location and even ask questions of our speakers and panelists beforehand. Your engagement is vital to the continuation of the Commission's work.

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Past Events

Tackling the Crisis of Chronic Disease

November 14, 2013: Tackling the Crisis of Chronic Disease

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) – including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory conditions and cancers – are the leading causes of death worldwide. An estimated 80% of these fatalities occur in developing countries – millions of which are preventable. This is an urgent global health issue that demands analysis of gaps in NCD research, new policies and practices, and actionable recommendations to close the gaps. Please join us for a panel discussion occasioned by the publication of Noncommunicable Diseases in the Developing World: Addressing Gaps in Global Policy and Research (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013). Contributors to the book and other stakeholders will discuss what action can be taken now to advance the global campaign against NCDs.
U.S. Health Partnerships in the Mekong

November 12, 2013: U.S. Health Partnerships in the Mekong

On November 12, 2013, the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and the CSIS Sumitro Chair for Southeast Asia Studies will host a day-long conference focused on U.S. Health Partnerships in the Mekong. The conference will feature senior Obama administration leaders on evolving US health engagement in the Mekong, as well as senior officials and experts from the region. A formal agenda is forthcoming. To ensure a seat at the conference, please register now.
Syria’s Evolving Health Crisis and the Impact on its Neighbors

September 17, 2013: Syria’s Evolving Health Crisis and the Impact on its Neighbors

Since Syria’s internal war began two years ago, the accumulating human consequences have been dire, both inside Syria and across the region: an estimated 100,000 people dead; the deliberate targeting of civilians and health infrastructure and medical personnel; mass internal displacement and the mass exodus of refugees to neighboring countries; and a worsening environment for the delivery of humanitarian assistance. Please join us for a timely discussion that will analyze events on the ground in Syria, their impact on neighboring states, and the actions of the international community both to meet humanitarian needs and serve the strategic interests of key international actors.
Ending Child Marriage and Advancing U.S. Policy

July 31, 2013: Ending Child Marriage and Advancing U.S. Policy

Please join us for a discussion on how ending child marriage advances U.S. foreign policy objectives. Child marriage violates many human rights; it is also a threat to the prosperity and stability of countries. This event will explore how child marriage undermines U.S. development and foreign policy objectives and how the United States can more effectively work to end child marriage and raise the status of girls around the world.
A Greater Mekong Health Security Partnership

July 29, 2013: A Greater Mekong Health Security Partnership

Please join us for a lunchtime launch of an important new CSIS publication, A Greater Mekong Health Security Partnership, which argues there is a unique, time-sensitive opportunity for a targeted, major U.S. initiative to improve health security in the Greater Mekong Subregion. A U.S. push to strengthen partnerships with Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos -- to manage pandemic threats, control resistant malaria, and improve maternal and child health -- will advance both U.S. strategic interests and bring real health benefits to millions. It can be done if there is high-level U.S. leadership, better leveraging of the substantial civilian and military U.S. health engagement efforts already underway, and focused integration of the skills and expertise of Thailand and China.
Promising Developments in Global Tuberculosis Control

June 28, 2013: Promising Developments in Global Tuberculosis Control

Please join Dr. Peter Small, Senior Program Officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, for an interactive conversation about these promising developments in global tuberculosis prevention and control, including how they may improve U.S. global TB policies. Mr. Todd Summers, Senior Adviser with the CSIS Global Health Policy Center, will moderate the discussion.
Attacks on Syria’s Medical Personnel and Facilities

May 10, 2013: Attacks on Syria’s Medical Personnel and Facilities

Syria's Assad regime has, with increasing intensity over the past year, systematically targeted medical facilities, staff and patients on an egregious scale with profound human consequences. Armed opposition have also defied the impartiality and neutrality of medical services. Please join us on Friday, May 10, from 2:00-4:00pm at CSIS for a roundtable discussion. Panelists will discuss the trajectory of attacks, the resulting institutional damage and public health implications, evolving efforts by governments, international bodies and NGOs to mitigate these impacts, and prospects in the future for accountability and rehabilitation.
The Last Mile: Ending Neglected Tropical Diseases in the Americas

May 07, 2013: The Last Mile: Ending Neglected Tropical Diseases in the Americas

Approximately 1.4 billion people in the world are infected with one or more of the seven most common neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). NTDs have severe public health consequences, including: malnutrition, anemia, serious and permanent disability and disfigurement, illness, and even death. Not only do NTDs disproportionately affect poor and vulnerable populations, the public health consequences of these diseases threaten broader economic and social improvement in affected nations. The countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) have recognized the threat from NTDs and have begun to unite to work to eliminate a number of these diseases from their region. The LAC countries, supported by multilateral organizations, are working to achieve the elimination of NTDs as a public health threat by 2015 through proven, cost-effective interventions. Please join us for a public discussion that will highlight the progress and prospects for NTD elimination in Latin America and the Caribbean.
The Policy Implications of the Institute of Medicine’s Evaluation of PEPFAR

April 30, 2013: The Policy Implications of the Institute of Medicine’s Evaluation of PEPFAR

The Institute of Medicine’s recently completed Evaluation of PEPFAR assesses the program’s performance over the past decade, as it transitioned from an emergency response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic to an emphasis on strengthening health systems in focal countries. The Evaluation of PEPFAR was a four-year, congressionally mandated review of PEPFAR; it is only the second major review of the program. For this occasion, we have convened representatives from the U.S. administration, evaluation participants, and independent experts to discuss the review’s implications for PEPFAR's policy priorities in the second Obama term.
Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs

April 29, 2013: Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs

This event will feature an expert discussion on the findings and recommendations of The Institute of Medicine’s recently released report titled “Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs.” Commissioned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, this report raises important, indeed frightening, concerns about the quality and reliability of medicines around the world. The problem of illegitimate drugs has significant and sometimes tragic consequences in the U.S. and other developed nations, as well as in low- and middle-income countries that often have weaker capacities. This event will include a conversation with the lead author of the study, FDA leadership, and representatives from industry and regulatory bodies.
U.S. Policy Priorities for Global Health Diplomacy and Multilateral Engagement

April 05, 2013: U.S. Policy Priorities for Global Health Diplomacy and Multilateral Engagement

During the first Obama term, global health diplomacy took on elevated importance as a U.S. foreign policy objective. Both the Department of State and the Department of Health and Human Services appear poised to continue to raise the diplomatic profile of global health during the second Obama term. Over the next year, U.S. diplomats will be challenged to help ensure: smooth, sufficient replenishments of the GAVI Alliance, the World Bank International Development Association, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; the articulation of a robust set of goals to advance the post-2015 Millennium Development agenda; and mutually beneficial relationships with emerging powers, many of which are active global health actors.
U.S. Navy Humanitarian Assistance in an Era of Austerity

March 11, 2013: U.S. Navy Humanitarian Assistance in an Era of Austerity

Over the last decade, the U.S. Navy has substantially enlarged its scheduled, preplanned humanitarian engagement in the Pacific, the Americas, and Africa. After an expansionary period that began with the 2005 response to the Indian Ocean tsunami, intensifying budget pressures are now triggering spirited debate about the true value of these “soft power” missions, which utilize scarce personnel, funding, and assets that otherwise would be dedicated to more traditional and more easily measured and justified “hard power” missions. In June 2012, to help frame and inform this complex debate, CSIS launched an independent study of U.S. Navy humanitarian assistance, chaired by Admiral Gary Roughead, U.S. Navy (retired). The resulting report, U.S. Navy Humanitarian Assistance in an Era of Austerity, was released at CSIS on Monday, March 11, 2013.
U.S. Policy Priorities for Women’s Global Health in the Obama Second Term

March 07, 2013: U.S. Policy Priorities for Women’s Global Health in the Obama Second Term

At this session, expert panelists will discuss the opportunities and challenges facing the second Obama administration in moving from policy to implementation on women’s global health issues.
Research and Development for Global Health: The Contributions of China and India

November 05, 2012: Research and Development for Global Health: The Contributions of China and India

Over the past decade, China and India have emerged as hotbeds of innovation for new biomedical products that have benefitted millions of people throughout the developing world. At this session expert panelists will discuss each nation’s contributions in this area; describe the policy priorities that have set the stage for recent R&D activities; identify barriers to continued R&D expansion; and discuss the optimal mix of incentives and regulations that can stimulate further growth in this sector.
Global Health as a Bridge to Security

November 02, 2012: Global Health as a Bridge to Security

Please join us for a lunchtime launch of our new publication, Global Health as a Bridge to Security, which looks at the intersection of health and security in U.S. foreign policy over the last decade. The keynote will be given by Admiral William Fallon, U.S. Navy (retired), who chaired this effort, followed by a roundtable discussion with Admiral Fallon, Rear Admiral Thomas Cullison, U.S. Navy (retired), Ambassador Cameron Hume, and Dr. Ellen Embrey on the top priority agenda items for future military engagement overseas in public health.

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