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“An Emergency that Requires Risk Taking”

“An Emergency that Requires Risk Taking”

“The very progress we’ve made in HIV/AIDS over the last 20 years is at risk right now because of our lack of engagement with young women.”
Traffic and Sex on the Road to School

Traffic and Sex on the Road to School

I recently traveled to Tanzania as part of a CSIS delegation looking at the U.S.-Tanzania relationship around maternal health and child survival. Our first afternoon, we took a city tour with a guide whose encyclopedic knowledge of Tanzania set the stage for the conversations and site visits we would have throughout the week.
Hope for a more reasoned U.S. approach to global TB

Hope for a more reasoned U.S. approach to global TB

The annual global numbers of TB disease cases and TB deaths have been falling slowly since the 1990s. The numbers of U.S. residents newly diagnosed with TB disease every year have also been falling over the same period. In effect, successful TB treatment has saved millions of lives over that period.
Innovative Financing and its Role in Global Health

Innovative Financing and its Role in Global Health

At the March 2015 Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Conference, there was a notable, repeated emphasis on the importance of health system strengthening, universal health coverage, and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
An adequate workforce: essential to dealing with dangerous unforeseen outbreaks

An adequate workforce: essential to dealing with dangerous unforeseen outbreaks

At the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) annual conference, held in Boston, March 26 – 28, the global shortage of trained health workers was a theme that underpinned many of the sessions.
Creating a Roadmap for Global Cancer Care

Creating a Roadmap for Global Cancer Care

“Cancer is a death sentence.” “It is too complicated and dangerous to treat cancer patients in poor places.” “Cancer treatment is too expensive.” Put forth by Dr. Lawrence Shulman of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, these were among the myths surrounding cancer care in low and middle income countries (LMIC) explored at the 2015 Symposium on Global Cancer Research in Boston.
SDGs Require both systems and disease-specific funding

SDGs Require both systems and disease-specific funding

The years-old deliberation over the value of investment in health systems versus support for programs aimed at individual diseases took center stage at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health March 27 in Boston.
Post Disaster Mental Health in Japan: Lessons and challenges

Post Disaster Mental Health in Japan: Lessons and challenges

Today marks four years since the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. The "triple disasters" -- earthquake, tsunami, and the nuclear reactors’ meltdown -- generated significant psychological stress for the affected population: physical relocations, loss of family members, and loss of income.
After The Worst In Liberia And Sierra Leone

After The Worst In Liberia And Sierra Leone

From January 19-27, my colleague Cathryn Streifel and I traveled to Liberia and Sierra Leone to engage with national leaders, health workers, non-governmental organization implementers, international organizations, and United States, United Kingdom, and other officials. It was a moment of hope and nervous adjustment, as Ebola cases dropped suddenly and unexpectedly in Liberia, followed by reductions in Sierra Leone and Guinea.
Fighting HIV: Time to Focus, Says Debbi Birx

Fighting HIV: Time to Focus, Says Debbi Birx

In a recent blog post, PEPFAR director Ambassador Debbi Birx outlines an aggressive agenda (called PEPFAR 3.0) for the next four years that emphasizes her commitment to focusing its resources better (their theme: “Focus, Partner, Achieve: An AIDS-free Generation”).

Three Stories to Watch in 2015

As we head into the new year, here are three global health stories to keep an eye on in 2015:
Ebola Vaccines and Antivirals: What Lies Ahead?

Ebola Vaccines and Antivirals: What Lies Ahead?

The session grew out of a shared sense that a pivotal moment has arrived. In the final quarter of 2014, rapidly accelerating efforts to develop Ebola vaccines have stirred excitement and raised expectations, tempered by continued uncertainty about the safety and efficacy of vaccine candidates. 2015 is likely to witness multiple, ambitious field trials in West Africa and elsewhere, in the midst of formidable challenges and continued debate.

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