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Taking a Bite out of Vector-Borne Diseases

Taking a Bite out of Vector-Borne Diseases

“Preventing vector-borne diseases” was the 2014 World Health Day (April 7) theme. The World Health Organization (WHO), which organizes the annual World Health Day, is using this year’s slogan, “Small bite: big threat,” to raise awareness about the long-term health, social and economic challenges posed by such debilitating diseases as malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, and Lyme disease, which are transmitted to humans by mosquitoes, flies, ticks, and other vectors. With more than one billion people globally infected by vector-borne diseases each year, and with one million deaths occurring annually as a result, this year’s World Health Day message is that strengthening prevention activities and protecting the most vulnerable social sectors from vector-borne diseases are essential. Through international, regional, and local level cooperation in managing educational campaigns and vector-management activities, community members and public officials can work hand in hand to take a bite out of vector-borne diseases.
Bordering on Unhealthy: Violence and Health on the U.S.-Mexico Border

Bordering on Unhealthy: Violence and Health on the U.S.-Mexico Border

It’s dangerous -- and downright unhealthy -- to be a young man in Mexico these days. According to Mexico’s National Institute for Statistics and Geography, in 2011 homicide was the leading cause of death among men ages 15 to 34. While murder is among the top causes of death for this age group in many parts of the world, Mexico’s homicide rate increased dramatically from 8.1 per 100,000, in 2007, to 23.7 per 100,000, in 2011, amid escalating violence connected to the federal government’s campaign against drug trafficking organizations. The violence has taken a particularly brutal toll on young Mexican men, who are the most likely to be recruited into the cartels’ activities, and raises the question of how the United States can collaborate with Mexico in addressing the issue.
How the U.S. Can Honor International Women’s Day

How the U.S. Can Honor International Women’s Day

To mark International Women’s Day, First Lady Michelle Obama participated in the 2014 International Women of Courage awards ceremony at the State Department on March 4. The honorees, representing ten countries, were recognized for their extraordinary work on behalf of women and girls -- from combatting gender-based violence and acid attacks, to advancing reproductive health and human rights. The First Lady spoke passionately about the need to confront the challenges that women and girls face at home and around the world, and about how the women being honored “are creating ripples that stretch across the globe.”
Video: Fighting Counterfeit Medicines

Video: Fighting Counterfeit Medicines

FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg discusses her recent trip to India and the global effort to keep substandard and fake drugs out of the hands of consumers.
CSIS Delegation Examines Family Planning in Ethiopia

CSIS Delegation Examines Family Planning in Ethiopia

The Government of Ethiopia has recognized the importance of family planning for women's health and empowerment and for achieving broader health and development goals for the country. Political commitment is high and significant progress has been made, but Ethiopia faces complex challenges in reaching their ambitious goal to expand contraceptive prevalence to 66% by 2015. For these reasons, the CSIS Global Health Policy Center chose to take a U.S. delegation to Ethiopia to examine family planning as a cross-cutting development issue.
Family Planning Benefits the Entire Family

Family Planning Benefits the Entire Family

The Ethiopian Government's leadership on family planning has been impressive, but there is still a lot of work to be done. Ethiopia is a culturally, religiously, and geographically diverse country. This diversity contributes to the complexity of expanding access to family planning and further complicates many of the challenges.
The Global Health Security Agenda: A Snowy Promising Start

The Global Health Security Agenda: A Snowy Promising Start

On February 13, while official Washington, D.C. was otherwise shuttered by the winter’s largest snow storm, the Obama administration launched the Global Health Security Agenda. The GHS Agenda marks an important and promising turning point in U.S. policy. It is timely, coherent, compelling and concrete. Whether it is successful over the medium to long term will rest on the results achieved, whether the United States and partners continue to see value in staying engaged diplomatically, whether there are ample resources to build capacity, and whether those powers joined in the GHS Agenda conversations are willing to confront systematically how the world’s broken places threaten health security.
Video: Deb Rosenblum on Global Health Security Threats

Video: Deb Rosenblum on Global Health Security Threats

Deborah Rosenblum, Executive Vice President at the Nuclear Threat Initiative, discusses the new Global Health Security Agenda and why it’s important for organizations focused on different threats (biological, nuclear, chemical) to work together on health security.
Video: Implementing the Global Health Security Agenda

Video: Implementing the Global Health Security Agenda

Dr. Tom Inglesby, Chief Executive Officer and Director of the UPMC Center for Health Security, discusses the newly launched Global Health Security Agenda and its likely impact on infectious disease programs internationally.
Video: Technology in Global Health Security

Video: Technology in Global Health Security

Dr. Kavita Berger, Associate Director, Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, explains how the science and technology community can make a difference in the newly launched Global Health Security Agenda.
Video: Laura Holgate on the Global Health Security Agenda

Video: Laura Holgate on the Global Health Security Agenda

Laura Holgate, Senior Director at the National Security Council discusses the White House launch of the new Global Health Security Agenda aimed at preventing or mitigating disease outbreaks.
Video: Tom Frieden on Fighting Global Health Security Threats

Video: Tom Frieden on Fighting Global Health Security Threats

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden discusses the new Global Health Security Agenda and the effort to create emergency operations centers to respond to health threats around the world.

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